Wearable Art

fashion in art, art in fashion
This looks like a medieval wall tapestry in jacket form. Love! 
velvetrunway:

Mother of Pearl | Autumn/Winter 2014

This looks like a medieval wall tapestry in jacket form. Love! 

velvetrunway:

Mother of Pearl | Autumn/Winter 2014

(via epcutler)

philamuseum:

Lady Edith’s Downtown Abbey look reminds us of a Myrbor evening dress from our collection. Thérèse and Louise Bonney’s book “Shopping Guide to Paris” (1929) described Myrbor as “a changing exhibit of modern art,” commenting, “If you like to see a Léger or a Lurçat or a Picasso on your walls, you will like to wear Myrbor clothes.”

Woman’s Evening Dress,” c. 1926, embroidery designed by Natalia Sergeyevna Goncharova, made by the firm of Myrbor

Photo: Nick Briggs/Carnival Film & Television for “Masterpiece,” via The New York Times

L’Officiel Singapore Spring 2014 ”Pop Art”- Photographed by An Le, Styled by Phuong My, Hair by Elsa, Makeup by Nigel Stanislaus

(Source: kmitt, via epcutler)

These sinuous sequined and lamé gowns just seem perfect for Oscar weekend. Happy Friday!

philamuseum:

“In the evening you have to knock ’em dead with glitter,” proclaimed Norman Norell. “Silver and Gold Fashions since 1960,” on view now at the Perelman Building, explores the ways he and other designers used sequins, lamé, and metallic elements to produce luxurious, sensuous, and innovative designs.

Woman’s ‘Mercury’ Evening Dress,” Fall/Winter 1994-95, designed by Geoffrey Beene

 Woman’s Evening Dress and Belt,” 1967, designed by Norman Norell 

 Woman’s Dress,” 1966, designed by Paco Rabanne 

Woman’s Evening Dress,” Fall 1982, designed by Hubert de Givenchy 

 Woman’s ‘Mermaid’ Evening Dress,” c. 1960, designed by Norman Norell

The Blue Kimono by William Merritt Chase, 1898. Courtesy of the Parrish Museum.
I’ve always hated wearing clothes around the house. My husband thinks it’s odd that I immediately put pajamas when I step foot in the apartment, but why where street clothes when flannel bottoms or whispy nightgowns are so much more comfortable. Today, as I’m drinking tea and nursing an injured ankle and crampy stomach, however, I long for something in between. Like a kimono, which became the height of fashion for a certain kind of European or American woman in the late 19th century, after Japan finally opened opened its doors to trade. (The wealthy bohemian art patroness, that is.) Indeed, the idea of “loungewear” seems to have disappeared entirely, with people either wearing jeans or sweatpants to lay about the house. Well, I’m bringing it back!

The Blue Kimono by William Merritt Chase, 1898. Courtesy of the Parrish Museum.

I’ve always hated wearing clothes around the house. My husband thinks it’s odd that I immediately put pajamas when I step foot in the apartment, but why where street clothes when flannel bottoms or whispy nightgowns are so much more comfortable. Today, as I’m drinking tea and nursing an injured ankle and crampy stomach, however, I long for something in between. Like a kimono, which became the height of fashion for a certain kind of European or American woman in the late 19th century, after Japan finally opened opened its doors to trade. (The wealthy bohemian art patroness, that is.) Indeed, the idea of “loungewear” seems to have disappeared entirely, with people either wearing jeans or sweatpants to lay about the house. Well, I’m bringing it back!