Wearable Art

fashion in art, art in fashion
Proof that fashion is indeed cyclical. (And that we’ve been recycling trends for centuries.) This young woman’s dress has a Byzantine feel with the gold embroidered strip that runs down the front of the garment.
history-of-fashion:

1886 Gabriel Schachinger - The Forget-Me-Not

Proof that fashion is indeed cyclical. (And that we’ve been recycling trends for centuries.) This young woman’s dress has a Byzantine feel with the gold embroidered strip that runs down the front of the garment.

history-of-fashion:

1886 Gabriel Schachinger - The Forget-Me-Not

(via womenreading)

L’Officiel Singapore Spring 2014 ”Pop Art”- Photographed by An Le, Styled by Phuong My, Hair by Elsa, Makeup by Nigel Stanislaus

(Source: kmitt, via epcutler)

These sinuous sequined and lamé gowns just seem perfect for Oscar weekend. Happy Friday!

philamuseum:

“In the evening you have to knock ’em dead with glitter,” proclaimed Norman Norell. “Silver and Gold Fashions since 1960,” on view now at the Perelman Building, explores the ways he and other designers used sequins, lamé, and metallic elements to produce luxurious, sensuous, and innovative designs.

Woman’s ‘Mercury’ Evening Dress,” Fall/Winter 1994-95, designed by Geoffrey Beene

 Woman’s Evening Dress and Belt,” 1967, designed by Norman Norell 

 Woman’s Dress,” 1966, designed by Paco Rabanne 

Woman’s Evening Dress,” Fall 1982, designed by Hubert de Givenchy 

 Woman’s ‘Mermaid’ Evening Dress,” c. 1960, designed by Norman Norell

The Blue Kimono by William Merritt Chase, 1898. Courtesy of the Parrish Museum.
I’ve always hated wearing clothes around the house. My husband thinks it’s odd that I immediately put pajamas when I step foot in the apartment, but why where street clothes when flannel bottoms or whispy nightgowns are so much more comfortable. Today, as I’m drinking tea and nursing an injured ankle and crampy stomach, however, I long for something in between. Like a kimono, which became the height of fashion for a certain kind of European or American woman in the late 19th century, after Japan finally opened opened its doors to trade. (The wealthy bohemian art patroness, that is.) Indeed, the idea of “loungewear” seems to have disappeared entirely, with people either wearing jeans or sweatpants to lay about the house. Well, I’m bringing it back!

The Blue Kimono by William Merritt Chase, 1898. Courtesy of the Parrish Museum.

I’ve always hated wearing clothes around the house. My husband thinks it’s odd that I immediately put pajamas when I step foot in the apartment, but why where street clothes when flannel bottoms or whispy nightgowns are so much more comfortable. Today, as I’m drinking tea and nursing an injured ankle and crampy stomach, however, I long for something in between. Like a kimono, which became the height of fashion for a certain kind of European or American woman in the late 19th century, after Japan finally opened opened its doors to trade. (The wealthy bohemian art patroness, that is.) Indeed, the idea of “loungewear” seems to have disappeared entirely, with people either wearing jeans or sweatpants to lay about the house. Well, I’m bringing it back!

This Valentino couture dress, depicting German Renaissance painter Lucas Cranach’s Adam and Eve, is INSANE.

girlannachronism:

Valentino spring 2014 couture collection- “Le jardin d’Eden”, a zirconium-colored tulle dress, embroidered in silk threads, with a scene of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden inspired by the painting "Adam and Eve" by Lucas Cranach in 1526, taking 2,200 hours to hand embroider. 

(via epcutler)

I guess if you are going to base your collection on Goya’s Duchess of Alba paintings, you better have velvet and lots of ruffles. 

Looks from Emilio de la Morena’s Spring 2014 show. Goya’s “The White Duchess,” 1795, from the collection of the Duchess of Alba, and “Mourning Portrait of the Duchess of Alba,” 1797, from the Hispanic Society of America

iheartnorwegianwood:

The full lingerie set for the Rijksstudio project in collaboration with @etsy and @rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The museum has digitally photographed and uploaded a large part of their collection, which is now available online for public use. They decided to collaborate with five Etsy artists from around the world to show examples of how these images could be used. I was asked to create a lingerie set. I cheated a bit and also made a silk/fringe kimono cardigan…
For now this lingerie set will only exist in the museum, but I will be launching a capsule collection of 3 lingerie sets and 3 coordinating kimonos, using art from the Rijksmuseum, this spring!

iheartnorwegianwood:

The full lingerie set for the Rijksstudio project in collaboration with @etsy and @rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The museum has digitally photographed and uploaded a large part of their collection, which is now available online for public use. They decided to collaborate with five Etsy artists from around the world to show examples of how these images could be used. I was asked to create a lingerie set. I cheated a bit and also made a silk/fringe kimono cardigan…

For now this lingerie set will only exist in the museum, but I will be launching a capsule collection of 3 lingerie sets and 3 coordinating kimonos, using art from the Rijksmuseum, this spring!

(via epcutler)