Wearable Art

fashion in art, art in fashion
I want to see Alan Cumming in this outfit.
history-of-fashion:

ab. 1735 Enoch Seeman - Portrait of John Campbell Lord Glenorchy later 3rd Earl of Breadalbane

I want to see Alan Cumming in this outfit.

history-of-fashion:

ab. 1735 Enoch Seeman - Portrait of John Campbell Lord Glenorchy later 3rd Earl of Breadalbane

philamuseum:

Today we remember Lauren Bacall (1924-2014) with this image of the actress visiting the Museum in 1958.
“Three Musicians,” 1921, Pablo Ruiz y Picasso © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

philamuseum:

Today we remember Lauren Bacall (1924-2014) with this image of the actress visiting the Museum in 1958.

Three Musicians,” 1921, Pablo Ruiz y Picasso © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

(via wine-loving-vagabond)

philamuseum:

In this painting of the Parisian dance hall Moulin Rouge, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec depicts a gangly male dancer in a top hat. This dancer, known as Valentine the Boneless, was so sinewy and agile that his legs appeared to be made of rubber when he danced.”At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance,” 1890, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

philamuseum:

In this painting of the Parisian dance hall Moulin Rouge, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec depicts a gangly male dancer in a top hat. This dancer, known as Valentine the Boneless, was so sinewy and agile that his legs appeared to be made of rubber when he danced.

At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance,” 1890, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

This really just seems like overkill, doesn’t it?
history-of-fashion:

1631 Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger - Portrait of Lady Anne Ruhout

This really just seems like overkill, doesn’t it?

history-of-fashion:

1631 Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger - Portrait of Lady Anne Ruhout

"View of Tokyo’s Shin-Ohashi bridge in Rain" Kobayashi Kiyochika / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Kobayashi Kiyochika’s gorgeous prints of the rapidly modernizing Tokyo of the late 19th century, after its opening up to the world, depicted the juxtaposition of Western and Eastern styles seen on the streets. Women tended to continue wearing the traditional kimono, while businessmen in particular adopted the suit of the West. Conversely, wealthy women in the West used their Eastern counterparts painted fans and silk robes to convey their worldliness.
Anyway, this is a long way to say that I loved the blue-and-white-striped worn with red undergarments in this painting, and—I don’t know if this is entirely coincidental—but Western women at this time had just begun wearing red underwear too (they were previously only allowed to wear white, if they were respectable). But, as I learned while researching a story about the history of lingerie, by the late 1800s even the prudish Queen Victoria had purchased a red petticoat, in an attempt to seduce her increasingly uninterested husband.
If you want to see more of Kiyochika’s work, there’s a lovely exhibition of his Tokyo cityscapes at the Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. through July 27.

"View of Tokyo’s Shin-Ohashi bridge in Rain" Kobayashi Kiyochika / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Kobayashi Kiyochika’s gorgeous prints of the rapidly modernizing Tokyo of the late 19th century, after its opening up to the world, depicted the juxtaposition of Western and Eastern styles seen on the streets. Women tended to continue wearing the traditional kimono, while businessmen in particular adopted the suit of the West. Conversely, wealthy women in the West used their Eastern counterparts painted fans and silk robes to convey their worldliness.

Anyway, this is a long way to say that I loved the blue-and-white-striped worn with red undergarments in this painting, and—I don’t know if this is entirely coincidental—but Western women at this time had just begun wearing red underwear too (they were previously only allowed to wear white, if they were respectable). But, as I learned while researching a story about the history of lingerie, by the late 1800s even the prudish Queen Victoria had purchased a red petticoat, in an attempt to seduce her increasingly uninterested husband.

If you want to see more of Kiyochika’s work, there’s a lovely exhibition of his Tokyo cityscapes at the Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. through July 27.

philamuseum:

Happy birthday to Gustav Klimt. Today we celebrate his special day with a painting he began in 1917, but was left unfinished by his sudden death in 1918. This masterful portraitist had an incredible impact on painting with his intimate depictions of women and remarkable detailing. Has anything unfinished ever looked so good?Now on view: “Frauenbildnis (Portrait of a Woman),” 1917–18, by Gustav Klimt (On loan from The Lewis Collection)

philamuseum:

Happy birthday to Gustav Klimt. Today we celebrate his special day with a painting he began in 1917, but was left unfinished by his sudden death in 1918. This masterful portraitist had an incredible impact on painting with his intimate depictions of women and remarkable detailing. Has anything unfinished ever looked so good?

Now on view: “Frauenbildnis (Portrait of a Woman),” 1917–18, by Gustav Klimt (On loan from The Lewis Collection)

tokyo-fashion:

“Kimono for a Modern Age” The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will be putting kimono from their permanent collection on display from July 5 - October 19, 2014. LA TImes Article

tokyo-fashion:

Kimono for a Modern Age
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will be putting kimono from their permanent collection on display from July 5 - October 19, 2014. LA TImes Article

(via lacma)