Wearable Art

fashion in art, art in fashion
"View of Tokyo’s Shin-Ohashi bridge in Rain" Kobayashi Kiyochika / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Kobayashi Kiyochika’s gorgeous prints of the rapidly modernizing Tokyo of the late 19th century, after its opening up to the world, depicted the juxtaposition of Western and Eastern styles seen on the streets. Women tended to continue wearing the traditional kimono, while businessmen in particular adopted the suit of the West. Conversely, wealthy women in the West used their Eastern counterparts painted fans and silk robes to convey their worldliness.
Anyway, this is a long way to say that I loved the blue-and-white-striped worn with red undergarments in this painting, and—I don’t know if this is entirely coincidental—but Western women at this time had just begun wearing red underwear too (they were previously only allowed to wear white, if they were respectable). But, as I learned while researching a story about the history of lingerie, by the late 1800s even the prudish Queen Victoria had purchased a red petticoat, in an attempt to seduce her increasingly uninterested husband.
If you want to see more of Kiyochika’s work, there’s a lovely exhibition of his Tokyo cityscapes at the Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. through July 27.

"View of Tokyo’s Shin-Ohashi bridge in Rain" Kobayashi Kiyochika / Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Kobayashi Kiyochika’s gorgeous prints of the rapidly modernizing Tokyo of the late 19th century, after its opening up to the world, depicted the juxtaposition of Western and Eastern styles seen on the streets. Women tended to continue wearing the traditional kimono, while businessmen in particular adopted the suit of the West. Conversely, wealthy women in the West used their Eastern counterparts painted fans and silk robes to convey their worldliness.

Anyway, this is a long way to say that I loved the blue-and-white-striped worn with red undergarments in this painting, and—I don’t know if this is entirely coincidental—but Western women at this time had just begun wearing red underwear too (they were previously only allowed to wear white, if they were respectable). But, as I learned while researching a story about the history of lingerie, by the late 1800s even the prudish Queen Victoria had purchased a red petticoat, in an attempt to seduce her increasingly uninterested husband.

If you want to see more of Kiyochika’s work, there’s a lovely exhibition of his Tokyo cityscapes at the Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. through July 27.

philamuseum:

Happy birthday to Gustav Klimt. Today we celebrate his special day with a painting he began in 1917, but was left unfinished by his sudden death in 1918. This masterful portraitist had an incredible impact on painting with his intimate depictions of women and remarkable detailing. Has anything unfinished ever looked so good?Now on view: “Frauenbildnis (Portrait of a Woman),” 1917–18, by Gustav Klimt (On loan from The Lewis Collection)

philamuseum:

Happy birthday to Gustav Klimt. Today we celebrate his special day with a painting he began in 1917, but was left unfinished by his sudden death in 1918. This masterful portraitist had an incredible impact on painting with his intimate depictions of women and remarkable detailing. Has anything unfinished ever looked so good?

Now on view: “Frauenbildnis (Portrait of a Woman),” 1917–18, by Gustav Klimt (On loan from The Lewis Collection)

tokyo-fashion:

“Kimono for a Modern Age” The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will be putting kimono from their permanent collection on display from July 5 - October 19, 2014. LA TImes Article

tokyo-fashion:

Kimono for a Modern Age
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will be putting kimono from their permanent collection on display from July 5 - October 19, 2014. LA TImes Article

(via lacma)

Van Gogh’s “Irises” made another appearance on the runway this week at Maison Martin Margiela’s very fun couture show.
Seriously, Van Gogh must be fashion’s most heavily remastered artist, after Warhol maybe. But even though Yves Saint Laurent and, more recently, Rodarte have appropriated VG’s flower paintings in the past, this felt fresh. Probably because it had a more cheeky, less pretentious, less reverent feel. Rodarte’s prom dresses printed in swirling Van Gogh brush strokes felt like the sort of typical swoony teenage-girl adoration of his paintings (which, most of their collections have this sort of swoony-fangirl kind of vibe, whether toward Japanese horror films or Star Wars, say). And YSL…
So, it’s funny. I saw the YSL biopic (the “official” one) recently), and I’ve been thinking about how Saint Laurent was on the one hand so instrumental to the creation of pret-a-porter (that is “designer” stuff that is “off the rack”) and the injection of pop (and counter-) culture into high fashion. Yet at the same time he always, ALWAYS, considered himself an artiste. And how his many sort of “art” collections—which were homages to more than riffs on artists list Mondrian and Van Gogh and Picasso—were this sort of way to elevate fashion—at least his fashion—to the realm of art.
Anyway, that was a long detour to saying that, yes, this has been done, but I still like this. And I would definitely wear it, you know, if I ever had a million dollars and was invited to, like, a film premiere or ball or something.

Van Gogh’s “Irises” made another appearance on the runway this week at Maison Martin Margiela’s very fun couture show.

Seriously, Van Gogh must be fashion’s most heavily remastered artist, after Warhol maybe. But even though Yves Saint Laurent and, more recently, Rodarte have appropriated VG’s flower paintings in the past, this felt fresh. Probably because it had a more cheeky, less pretentious, less reverent feel. Rodarte’s prom dresses printed in swirling Van Gogh brush strokes felt like the sort of typical swoony teenage-girl adoration of his paintings (which, most of their collections have this sort of swoony-fangirl kind of vibe, whether toward Japanese horror films or Star Wars, say). And YSL…

So, it’s funny. I saw the YSL biopic (the “official” one) recently), and I’ve been thinking about how Saint Laurent was on the one hand so instrumental to the creation of pret-a-porter (that is “designer” stuff that is “off the rack”) and the injection of pop (and counter-) culture into high fashion. Yet at the same time he always, ALWAYS, considered himself an artiste. And how his many sort of “art” collections—which were homages to more than riffs on artists list Mondrian and Van Gogh and Picasso—were this sort of way to elevate fashion—at least his fashion—to the realm of art.

Anyway, that was a long detour to saying that, yes, this has been done, but I still like this. And I would definitely wear it, you know, if I ever had a million dollars and was invited to, like, a film premiere or ball or something.

thegetty:

detailsofpaintings:

Franz Xavier Winterhalter, Queen Victoria (detail)
1842

"Winterhalter’s…popularity among patrons came from his ability to create the image his sitters wished or needed to project to their subjects. He was able to capture the moral and political climate of each court, adapting his style to each client until it seemed as if his paintings acted as press releases, issued by a master of public relations." —from our short bio on Winterhalter

This. 

thegetty:

detailsofpaintings:

Franz Xavier Winterhalter, Queen Victoria (detail)

1842

"Winterhalter’s…popularity among patrons came from his ability to create the image his sitters wished or needed to project to their subjects. He was able to capture the moral and political climate of each court, adapting his style to each client until it seemed as if his paintings acted as press releases, issued by a master of public relations." —from our short bio on Winterhalter

This. 

I missed this weekend that the great art and fashion historian Anne Hollander died. Her book Seeing Through Clothes, which I read in graduate school, inspired me to start this erstwhile Tumblr. (For a less academic intro to her writing, I recommend this piece she wrote for New York magazine about period-film costumes.) Below is the Paris Review’s eulogy.
theparisreview:

“She expanded the rhetoric and insight of criticism about style, engaging where most writers thought there was nothing to engage with.”
Remembering art historian Anne Hollander.

I missed this weekend that the great art and fashion historian Anne Hollander died. Her book Seeing Through Clothes, which I read in graduate school, inspired me to start this erstwhile Tumblr. (For a less academic intro to her writing, I recommend this piece she wrote for New York magazine about period-film costumes.) Below is the Paris Review’s eulogy.

theparisreview:

“She expanded the rhetoric and insight of criticism about style, engaging where most writers thought there was nothing to engage with.”

Remembering art historian Anne Hollander.

sighswhispers:

Elizabeth Threatt photographed by Louise Dahl-Wolfe for Harper’s Bazaar, 1951.

sighswhispers:

Elizabeth Threatt photographed by Louise Dahl-Wolfe for Harper’s Bazaar, 1951.

wine-loving-vagabond:

lapitiedangereuse:

Spanish Torero, John Singer Sargent, in Gardner Museum, Boston

This is a photograph by Peruvian born artist Peter Müller. He did a whole series and book about the suit of lights that bullfighters wear. You can browse the book a little here.

wine-loving-vagabond:

lapitiedangereuse:

Spanish Torero, John Singer Sargent, in Gardner Museum, Boston

This is a photograph by Peruvian born artist Peter Müller. He did a whole series and book about the suit of lights that bullfighters wear. You can browse the book a little here.

enchanteur-co:

Raquel Zimmermann in “Art Walk” by Willy Vanderperre for W Magazine June/July 2014

(via epcutler)